Archive for the ‘refugees’ Category


The ‘I Welcome’ exhibition is now open in the Salisbury Library and will last until the end of December.  It focuses on the plight of refugees and consists of a series of 30 powerful photographs from the Magnum agency.  Refugees get a poor reception in the UK and the numbers we take in is a tiny proportion of the total.  Rich countries generally take in a very small proportion.  The exhibition is free and visitors are invited to make any comments in the book provided.

Advertisements

Exhibition on refugees in the Library – 2nd to 29th December

Throughout December we will be hosting an exhibition in the Library with a display of 30 evocative panels entitled I Welcome.  There are 30 panels and they represent the experience of millions of refugees, people of all ages, faiths and walks of life.  The exhibition was first shown on the South Bank a year ago and attracted considerable media attention.  Refugees get a bad press in the UK and there is considerable hostility to them coming here.  Some of this hostility is whipped up by the media.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It will be on display upstairs (a lift is available) and is free.  All the photographs are by Magnum photographers.

The Library is open:

Monday:  10 – 7pm

Tuesday/Friday:  9 – 7pm

Wednesday/Thursday/Saturday: 9 – 5pm

The exhibition is FREE

Refugee Vigil

Posted: September 29, 2017 in asylum, refugees
Tags: , , , ,

Members of the Salisbury group held a vigil in front of the Guildhall in Salisbury in support of refugees and asylum seekers.  We were delighted with the response which was not huge but even so, several came forward and thanked us for our efforts which was gratifying.  A number signed our petition.  Refugees and asylum seekers get a poor reception in this country and the negative nature of coverage by the tabloid press cannot help.  We reported in a previous blog, Sir Vince Cable’s observation that Theresa May, when she was Home Secretary, suppressed a number of reports which showed the benefits of immigration.  She is also famous for the statement to a Conservative party conference about a man unable to be deported ‘because he had a cat’: “I’m not making this up” she famously said.  Only she was.

For another picture of this event go to this link on the Salisbury Camera Club site.


Some group members at the Guildhall

If you live in the Salisbury area and are interested in joining us we would be pleased to see you.  The best thing is to keep an eye on this Website or on Twitter or Facebook (salisburyai) for our events and come along and introduce yourself.  It is free to join the local group.

 

 

 


Ice and Fire to perform in Salisbury

The performing group Ice and Fire are to perform in Salisbury at Sarum College on 18 September starting at 7:30.  The performance will consist of readings from testimonies of refugees, human rights lawyers and home office workers, to show how the system of asylum seeking and acquiring refugee status works in reality in the UK.  It forms part of Amnesty’s continuing campaign to highlight the plight of refugees and how they are treated here.

There is considerable hostility to refugees and asylum seekers with many stories in our tabloid newspapers of such people abusing the system.  People are led to believe that hoards are arriving here and living in hotels by the seaside and costing the country huge sums of money.  The reality is the UK has only 1% of the world’s refugees and has received around 3% of asylum claims made in the EU.

The event is FREE but there will be a parting collection.

A review by The Cambridge Student of an earlier performance.


If you live in the Salisbury area and are interested in joining us you would be very welcome.  If you can come to this event, several group members will be about so just make yourself known.  It is free to join the local group.  Details of other activities will be on this site and on Facebook and Twitter – salisburyai.


Talk by someone who escaped from the hermit state of North Korea

Jihyun Park. Picture: Right to Remain

This Thursday 16th March Jihyun Park who managed to escape the closed country of North Korea will be giving a talk at the Five Rivers Leisure Centre, Hulse Road starting at 7:30 pm.  Ji has led an incredible life having managed to escape the prison state of North Korea to China.  In China she was trafficked and entered into a forced marriage.  She worked more or less as a slave in China and was subsequently arrested and returned to North Korea where she was sent to a labour camp.  She escaped again and now lives near Manchester.

North Korea is seldom out of the news these days with missile launches into the Sea of Japan and the murder of Kim Jong-un’s half brother in Malaysia.  But the human rights situation in that country is dire and people live in situations of great adversity.

The event is free and there is a departing collection to help with our expenses.


See our video on North Korea

Flyer for the talk


Group hosts a showing of refugee film Fire at Sea

On Friday 3rd February the group hosted a showing of the film Fire at Sea in the Arts Centre in Salisbury.  This film won the Golden Bear award at the Berlin film festival and tells the story of immigrants seeking to reach Europe, in this case the island of Lampedusa.  There are in effect two parallel story lines: one involving a small boy of around 12 who spends his time, with a friend, making and shooting a catapult and on his father’s fishing boat.  The other involves the immigrants packed onto boats bobbing about for days in the Mediterranean in their desperate efforts to reach Europe.  Some die of dehydration and others get burned by diesel fuel splashes as they refill the engines.  These burns can be serious and even fatal.  There are harrowing scenes of bodies being retrieved from the boats.

Picture: Spindle magazine

The feature of the film is that the two stories never overlap.  The islanders carry on their lives completely divorced from the drama that is taking place in the sea around them and in the holding centre where the immigrants are looked after.  The doctor is featured who is involved with vetting the immigrants and speaks matter of factly about the dire state of their health and how some of them die.  He is then shown treating the boy who is concerned about his breathing difficulty, which we are led to believe is imaginary.  These two contrasting scenes seem to sum up the theme of the film.

We took the opportunity to ask people to sign a petition on the refugee situation in Greece.

We are grateful to the Arts Centre for hosting this event.


Follow us on Twitter and Facebook – salisburyai.


This is an urgent action for refugees in Serbia

Over a thousand refugees and migrants are being exposed to disease and inhuman living conditions by the Serbian authorities who are failing to provide accommodation, food and healthcare to them.  They are being forced to endure the extreme cold winter temperatures by lighting fires and squatting in derelict warehouses in the capital.

If you can find time to write that would be appreciated.

Urgent action

 

 


l-andrew

Two Salisbury group members at the march

The march in aid of refugees was attended by at least 15,000 yesterday and was good natured and uplifting.  It started in Pall Mall, London, and wove its way along Piccadilly ending up in Parliament square.   It is encouraging in the current climate to see so many people travel from as far afield as the Wirral and Penzance to show their solidarity for a better treatment of refugees.  Britain’s role has been exceptionally poor largely because of hostility towards them egged on by a xenophobic press.

March assembles, Pall Mall

March assembles

img_4387 img_4388 img_4392 img_4393


UPDATE: 18 September

The march was a huge success and was attended by at least 15, 000 people.  A fuller report and pictures will be posted soon.

March in London on Saturday 17 September to support refugees

Source: Wikimedia

Women, men and children around the world are fleeing war, persection and torture.  They have been forced into the hands of smugglers and onto dangerous journeys across the sea in rickety old boats and dinghys.  Many have lost their lives.  Those who have made it often find themselves stranded in makeshift camps in train stations, ports or by the roadside.

And still, politicians across Europe fail to provide safe and legal routes for people to seek asylum.

Meanwhile, ordinary people have responded with extraordinary displays of humanity and generosity.  They’ve been moved to act after seeing thousands of people drowning in the Mediterranean, the continuing misery of camps in places like Calais, and images of the brutal conflicts across the world.

We need to tell the Prime Minister Theresa May that we want to help.

The UK government must do more – let’s call on them to:

  • Lead the way towards a more human global response to the millions fleeing conflict
  • Offer safe passage to the UK for more people who have been forced to flee their homes
  • Do more to help refugees in the UK rebuild their lives

The march starts at 11:30 outside Green Park station and ends in Parliament Square.

Further details here


Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @salisburyai


Group campaign event, Saturday 8 November

Group campaign event, Saturday 8 November

Yeonmi Park’s book A North Korean’s Girls Journey to Freedom starts today (Monday) on BBC Radio 4 at 09.45.  It is the book of the week.