Posts Tagged ‘film’


Film reveals terrible state of Chinese justice system

UPDATE:  if you have arrived here having picked up a leaflet at the Poetika event in Salisbury this evening – welcome!

A small audience at the Arts Centre watched a documentary film hosted by the Salisbury group called Hooligan Sparrow set in China.  The story concerns the attempts by a lawyer Ye Haiyan to get a college principal and his assistant prosecuted for spending the night in a hotel with 6 underage girls.  They were likely to have escaped punishment because of the endemic corruption of the Chinese police and communist party.   Subsequently they gave $2000 dollars to the girls which made them prostitutes and thus made them the criminals under the Chinese system.

Ye was determined to bring them to justice and started with a simple protest outside the school.  The film then charts the subsequent events of harassment, violence and intimidation by the police, secret police and hired thugs.  Remarkably, much of this is filmed and we can see and hear the activities of the police engaged in the intimidation.  Ye ends up homeless having been evicted from flats and hotels.  Finally, she returns to her home village to live in some quite basic accommodation.  A most telling and sad scene shows her and her daughter sat on the roadside with all their possessions piled up unable to find anywhere to live.   This exact scene is recreated in an exhibition in Brooklyn Museum in New York.

Ai WeiWei in prison. Pic: Salisbury Amnesty

The exhibition was of work by Ai WeiWei, an artist who has also been intimidated, arrested and interrogated by the police on more than one occasion.  He has a degree of fame outside China which gives him a modest level of protection.  During one of his imprisonments, he was subject to close surveillance 24 hours a day, every day, including when going to the toilet.  This was recreated in an exhibition at the Royal Academy three years ago (pictured)

Ye certainly lived a colourful life and at one time worked in a brothel which is where she acquired the nickname ‘sparrow’. In order to raise awareness for HIV prevention, Ye lived the illegal life of a sex worker, distributing free condoms while claiming that they were government subsidies.

Much of the footage was shaky as the filming took place under extreme duress.  We hear threats to kill her or break her legs.  It is nonetheless riveting work and vividly brings to life the dire state of human rights in China.  The list of infringements of human rights in the country are too many to list here as this report from Amnesty shows:

The government continued to draft and enact new laws under the guise of “national security” that presented serious threats to human rights.  Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo died in custody.  Activists and human rights defenders were detained, prosecuted and sentenced on the basis of vague and overbroad charges such as “subverting state power” and “picking quarrels and provoking trouble”.  Police detained human rights defenders outside formal detention facilities, sometimes incommunicado, for long periods, which posed additional risk of torture and other ill-treatment to the detainees.  Controls on the internet were strengthened. Repression of religious activities outside state-sanctioned churches increased.  Repression conducted under “anti-separatism” or “counter-terrorism” campaigns remained particularly severe in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region and Tibetan-populated areas.  Freedom of expression in Hong Kong came under attack as the government used vague and overbroad charges to prosecute pro-democracy activists.  [extract] Amnesty Report 2017/18

Much western coverage of China speaks of its economic progress and remarkable growth.  It is the world’s second most powerful nation and its activities in the South China Sea is causing real concern.  Western politicians fawn over President Xi Jing Ping in the hope of business.  But this film shows a lonely woman seeking justice on behalf of six young girls, being subjected to violence, intimidation and threats by a range of state agents.  China does its best to shield its citizens from outside influence shutting out foreign web sites behind the ‘Great Firewall of China‘.  One is reminded of other countries which behaved like this notably, Soviet Russia, East Germany and Rumania.  Each crumbled and it was the activity of a single person which often started the collapse – the priest in Rumania for example.  It can be like a stone chipping a windscreen.

The question is therefore, quite how powerful is the communist party in China that it feels the need to intimidate and mistreat any who question it?

The film was made by Nanfu Wang.  Our thanks to group member Fiona for organising this event.


If you would like to join the local group you would be very welcome.  We are holding a stall in the market place on 23 June so come along and make yourself known.

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[if you have come to this page from a ticket site, details of the film can be found here]

Minutes of the June meeting are available thanks to group member Lesley for compiling them.

June minutes (Word)


A reminder that the film Hooligan Sparrow will be shown next Thursday 14 June at 7:30 pm.  This is FREE but there is a parting collection to help cover our rental and other costs.  It’s at the Salisbury Arts Centre in the White Room upstairs.  Tickets can be obtained from the front desk.


We have pleasure in enclosing the minutes for the May meeting.

The June meeting takes place tonight (7 June)not next Thursday as is usual – because we shall be showing a film at the Arts Centre.

May (pdf)


Showing of the film Hooligan Sparrow in June

We are pleased to be able to show the documentary film Hooligan Sparrow at the Arts Centre on Thursday June 14 starting at 7:30.  It will be free but it will be ticketed and we are currently exploring ways to get tickets.  There will be a parting collection to help cover our costs.

The film is set in China and the danger is palpable as intrepid young filmmaker Nanfu Wang follows maverick activist Ye Haiyan (a.k.a Hooligan Sparrow) and her band of colleagues to Hainan Province in southern China to protest the case of six elementary school girls who were sexually abused by their principal.

Marked as ‘enemies of the state’, the activists are under constant government surveillance and face interrogation, harassment, and imprisonment.  Sparrow, who gained notoriety with her advocacy work for sex workers’ rights, continues to champion girls’ and women’s rights and arms herself with the power and reach of social media.

Filmmaker Wang becomes a target along with Sparrow, as she faces destroyed cameras and intimidation. Yet she bravely and tenaciously keeps shooting, guerrilla-style, with secret recording devices and hidden-camera glasses, and in the process, she exposes a startling number of undercover security agents on the streets.  Eventually, through smuggling footage out of the country, Wang is able tell the story of her journey with the extraordinary revolutionary Sparrow, her fellow activists, and their seemingly impossible battle for human rights.

(text taken from the website of the film)

Please keep an eye on this site and or on Twitter and Facebook (salisburyai) for details of how to get the tickets.   If you are interested in joining us this would be a good opportunity to make yourself known to a member of the group before or after the showing.


April minutes now available

Attached are the minutes of the last group meeting thanks to group member Lesley for compiling them.  We discussed the Celebration event (now cancelled); a summary of the death penalty report; North Korea; the film at the Arts Centre and future events generally.

April minutes (Word)


If you are interested in joining the group then either the film or the market stall are both opportunities to come along and introduce yourself to group members.  See the minutes for details of forthcoming events.  Also follow us on Facebook or Twitter – salisburyai


Minutes of the February group meeting

The minutes of our last meeting are now available thanks to group member Lesley for compiling them.  We were pleased to welcome a new member to the group.  We discussed the death penalty, the Celebration event (now looking doubtful), North Korea, the next film and more.

February minutes (Word)

New members always welcome.  Keep an eye on this site or Twitter and Facebook to see what we are doing and make yourself known.


Minutes for the November group meeting are attached thanks to group member for preparing them.  At the end of the minutes you will find a list of upcoming activities.  If you are interested in joining us, coming along to one of these events is the easiest thing to do.  It is free to join the local group.

November minutes (pdf)


The Other Side of Hope

In partnership with the Salisbury Arts Centre, we are showing the film The Other Side of Hope on Wednesday 29 November starting at 7:30.  Imbuing modern Helsinki with the retro melancholy of an Edward Hopper painting, this warm and deeply humane story tells of the unlikely friendship between a poker addicted shirt & tie salesman, who buys possibly the worst restaurant in the world after a big win, and a Syrian refugee who helps him turn it around.

Tickets 01722 321744 or boxoffice@salisburyarts.co.uk and their web site is http://www.salisburyartscentre.co.uk/whats-on/

Cert 12A  Concessions

Trailer

 


Members of the local group will be in evidence during the evening so if you are interested in joining, coming to this event would be a good way to make yourself known.


Attached are the minutes for the group meeting held on Thursday 12 October 2017 thanks to group member Lesley for preparing them.  A full agenda covering the death penalty, North Korea, upcoming events such as the film at the Arts Centre, Citizenship day, an exhibition at the Library and the plans for the Celebration of Human Rights in 2018.

Anyone local reading this interested in taking part then go to the end of the minutes where future events are listed.  Come along to one and make yourself known.  You can follow us on Twitter or Facebook if you prefer – salisburyai.

October minutes (Word)