Archive for the ‘Event’ Category

Summer BBQ

Posted: August 1, 2019 in Event, Group news, Uncategorized
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We regret to say that the BBQ has been called off.  Several people could not make it, two more have sent apologies and one is uncertain so it seemed rather pointless to continue.  But: we shall be meeting for a pub lunch at the New Inn in New Street from 12:30 on Sunday.

If you were thinking of joining the group we would like to see you.

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UPDATE: PLEASE NOTE THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELLED.  We have been informed today that Paul will be indisposed on this day and regretfully and unavoidably, he has had to cancel

Leading author and journalist coming to Salisburyclear bright future

We are delighted to announce that the famous journalist and author Paul Mason (pictured) will be speaking in Salisbury on 24 June at 7:30.  This is a free event but we do ask people to contribute to a parting collection to help with our costs.

Paul will be speaking about his new book Clear Bright Future: A Radical Defence of the Human Being.  The book is about the triple threat we face: the rise of authoritarian politicians and the destruction of verifiable truth; the rise of intelligent machines which will threaten the human claim to agency, and a rising sense of fatalism and irrationality which has led many to become susceptible to the mythologies of the new right.

The book is an argument for a defence of the human being against the creation of the ‘neoliberal self’ in the past three decades or so.  To resist this Mason argues, means fighting for universal rights and for human centric institutions.

Paul Mason

Picture: C Juergen-Bauer

Paul will be speaking at the Salisbury Methodist Church starting at 7:30 pm and the event is free.  We are asking for a parting contribution please.


The evening will be a good opportunity for you to join us if you wish.  The issue of the power of the tech giants and the effect this has on our freedoms is an issue we are likely as a group to pay more attention to in the future.  This may be a topic of interest to you in which case we would like to hear from you.  It is free to join us locally.


A concert is being organised by Sarum Concern for Israel/Palestine on 27 June at Salisbury Methodist Church.  Tickets are £12 on the door or £10 in advance with students £5.  http://www.thelittleboxoffice.com/palmusic.  Also 01722 349740.

The performers are the Palmusic Ensemble and the aim is to raise money for Palmusic UK scholarships. Three out of four of these four talented young musicians are making a return visit to Salisbury at the end of June when they again will play a mix of Western classical and Palestinian music.

For those who were at Salisbury Methodist Church in February 2018, it was a very memorable evening.  Omar and Tibah are brother and sister
studying viola and cello respectively at the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland. They are Druze from The Galilee. In the past Omar was conscripted to serve time in the Israeli Army but as an Arab Palestinian refused, serving time in prison.  On this occasion they
are joined by Lourdina – another violinist – who has studied in Bethlehem (her home town), Paris and now at the Royal Birmingham Conservatory.

All three have been awarded scholarships through Palmusic, which is short for The Friends of the Edward Said National Conservatory of Music, a UK charity, which  supports them financially, so this is a fund-raising evening for them. Iyad who works with them is a Jordanian-Palestinian and already a professional pianist who has recently made a recording of Khachaturian’s piano music.  The concert will include Mahler Piano Quartet in A minor, Mozart Piano Quartet in G minor K.478 and Arabic folk songs.

Further details from http://www.sarumconcern.org or http://www.palmusic.org.uk


Amnesty International South-West Regional Conference in Exeter 11 May 2019

These are some notes of the recent regional conference made by Salisbury group member Fiona. They are not an official record.

The keynote speaker was Emel Kurma, a Human Rights defender from Turkey, currently hosted by the University of York’s Protective Fellowship Scheme. She outlined for us how a Citizens’ Assembly works. Inspired by the Helsinki Final Act, these are low-profile bodies (no smart headquarters or logos) that aim to stimulate social and political discussion towards a peaceful and inclusive society, valuing democratic and environmental principles. The best response to a state’s limitation of individual freedom is to strengthen civil society at all levels, allowing ethical thinking to penetrate even closed structures. For example a liberal academic offered an opportunity to go to a conference abroad might instead hand it to a member of a state institution in order to broaden that individual’s understanding of human rights as practised beyond their country’s borders.

Emel Kurma is a brave individual and her stoical acceptance of probable interrogation and possible imprisonment on her return to Turkey is both shocking and inspiring.

Israel Palestine 

Two other reports (also by women) focused on Palestine and Eastern Europe respectively.
Penny Wilcox has for several years worked with the intriguingly-titled Ecumenical Accompaniment Programme in Israel and the Occupied Territories.  Again in an unobtrusive fashion, they accompany vulnerable Palestinians at checkpoints (adults going to work, children to school, traders etc.) and, simply by acting as protective witnesses, aim to reduce the levels of conflict or anxiety so often experienced by this oppressed population.  This approach is also practised by various Israeli humanitarian groups who wish to offer support to trapped and threatened Palestinian communities.  Even simply to witness and record the bulldozing of ‘illegal” Palestinian structures (cow byres, olive trees) is an act of silent protest and solidarity.  One of the many ironies of this absurd and tragic occupation is that when sometimes belligerent Israeli settlers have gone into Palestinian villages to cause trouble, the Israeli army itself has been called in to defend the Palestinians residents.

The third report came from Central Europe co-ordinator Ulricke Schmidt, who traced worrying trends in the rise of racism and anti-Semitism in Hungary and, to a lesser degree, in Poland.

Hungary

In Hungary the usual targets are the Roma, but the influx of refugees has now made them the focus of anger.  This in spite of the warm reception originally given to those fleeing war, who were perceived as ‘passing through’ Hungary and in manageable numbers.  However attitudes have hardened and Ulriche quoted an acquaintance who got 6 months imprisonment for giving a lift to a refugee while NGOs risk being criminalised for helping them.  Additionally, resentment against global capitalism has contributed to a revival of anti-Semitism.  Huge posters crudely stereo-type George Soros as ‘an enemy of the people’ with his ‘army of leftist terrorists’.

Ulricke defines some of the underlying causes of xenophobia as relating to globalisation – seen as benefiting the few – and to a drift to the cities which has left a frustrated and impoverished rural population to grasp at the promises of the Right to restore Hungary’s romanticised past (sounds familiar, does it not?).

Poland 

Poland reflects some of these trends, but fortunately to a lesser degree. Some liberal teachers have been disciplined and protesters have had their personal data published.  But Poland has had a more recent history of resistance to authoritarian rule.  When an outright ban was placed on abortion thousands of women marched in protest to overturn it.  When a recent Independence Day march was joined by racist demonstrators, fourteen brave women entered the throng and unfurled a Stop Fascism banner.  They were beaten by some marchers, and subsequently charged and fined by the courts for ‘disrupting a lawful demonstration.’  But a recently published video has now prompted an Appeal Court investigation into the attack..

The European Union has triggered Article 7 against Hungary for imperilling European values and has also expressed concern that the judiciary in Poland is being politicised.  On a more positive note, 26 EU countries have recently seen powerful demonstrations against fascism, racism and anti-Semitism.

Death penalty

The Death Penalty workshop confirmed that our group is very well informed on relevant data thanks to the regular updates from group member Lesley. The new network now has two and a half thousand members.  An interesting recent survey estimated that it was actually more expensive to execute a prisoner than to simply keep them in prison.  The campaign is currently now focusing on Singapore and Iran, the latter for its practice of deferring punishment until a sentenced juvenile is old enough to receive the death penalty.  On a positive note – more and more countries are abolishing the death penalty – 106 in total by the end of 2018.

Many thanks to the regional representative Chris Ramsay for organising this meeting.

Southampton event

Posted: April 28, 2019 in Event
Tags: , ,

Sing for Freedom

Our colleagues in Southampton are holding and event in June and have asked us to promote it locally which we are happy to do.  It is a folk concert and is in Freemantle on June 24th starting at 7:30.  Tickets are £6 on the door.  Further details on the poster link below:

Southampton event

Real Neat Blog Award

 


Forthcoming events by the Salisbury group

These are some of the events we have planned or are being planned by the local group.  One of these would be a good moment for you to make contact if you were thinking of joining us.

  • Market stall.  This will take place in the Market Square on 8 June 2019 and starts early.  We would be grateful if supporters could bring anything along for sale.  Wanted; china and bric-a-brac, jewellery, good books (not battered paper backs, sorry!), pickles and jams, plants and clothes.  CDs and DVDs are also popular (but not videos).  No 240v electrical goods for safety reasons.  Get in touch if you want anything collected.
  • Refugee week.  Details to follow and is during 17th – 23rd June.  Our last refugee action was on local TV.
  • Talk by Paul Mason.  We are delighted that the journalist and author Paul Mason who will be speaking about his soon to be published book Clear Bright Future: a Radical Defence of the Human Being.  This will take place on 24th June at 7:30 at the Salisbury Methodist Church and is free.  We will be asking for a parting collection to help cover our costs.  Copies of his book will be available to purchase.
  • Coffee morning.  This is on 7 September in the morning as you might expect and is at St Thomas’s church just off the square.  Further details nearer the time.
  • Other events will include a film in November, the World Day Against the Death Penalty and possibly an Evensong at the Cathedral.

You might want to add these dates to your diary.

15 April 2019


The Oscar nominated film The Breadwinner is showing this Friday, 8 March at the Arts Centre in Salisbury at 7:30 pm.  It concerns a young girl who pretends to be a boy in Taliban controlled Afghanistan to enable her to look after her family.  Cert 12A.  Tickets available from the Arts Centre, 01722 320 333, at the door or on line https://www.wiltshirecreative.co.uk/whats-on/salisbury-arts-centre/the-breadwinner/#book-tickets

There will be a short introduction by a member of our group.  If you are interested in joining the group we shall be around before and after the showing so it would be a good time to make yourself known.


Minutes of the January meeting are now available thanks to group member Lesley for preparing them. The group discussed recent actions and future activities. These include the film The Breadwinner on 8 March; the market stall on 8 June; Refugee week from 17 – 23 June and the photo exhibition currently on at the Methodist Church (Free).

If you would like to join the group you would be very welcome.  Best thing is to come to an event we are running and make yourself known.  

January minutes (Word)


List of forthcoming events being organised by the Salisbury Group

We have a fairly active programme of events and they are gathered here for convenience.  If you live in the Salisbury or even South Wilts area you would be welcome to come to any one of them.  If you are thinking of joining, then make yourself known to one of the group.  You would be very welcome.

Refugee Vigil – to be re-arranged.  We did have a date but unfortunately it clashed with the fair in the Market Square so it has been postponed

Citizenship Day – 26th October.  Where go into schools in the area and discuss human rights issues with pupils.  Despite several requests, the UTC has not responded

Christmas Tree Festival – 3rd – 10th December.  This is in St Thomas’s Church in the centre of Salisbury and we will be displaying a tree there.  It will focus on the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Human Rights Day Speaker – 10th December.   We are delighted to welcome Daniel Trilling who is an author and journalist and who will be speaking at the Methodist Church at 7pm.  This is a FREE event but we ask for a parting collection to help cover our costs

Exhibition of Refugee Photographs – January 2019 – Some

I Welcome exhibition

details to be worked out but these are the photos we displayed in the Library (pictured) and we are pleased that the Methodist Church has agreed to host them during the month.

 

Arts Centre Film – 8th March 2019.  We host a film once and sometimes twice a year in the Arts Centre.  Details nearer the time.

Market Stall (pictured) – 8th June 2019.  Fund raising stall we hold in the Market Square once a year

 

 

 

Carol singing.  With the aid of the Farrant Singers, we travel around the Victoria Road, College Street areas singing carols.  This will be in December and details to be announced.

We are also on Twitter and Facebook, salisburyai

 

 


The ‘I Welcome’ exhibition is now open in the Salisbury Library and will last until the end of December.  It focuses on the plight of refugees and consists of a series of 30 powerful photographs from the Magnum agency.  Refugees get a poor reception in the UK and the numbers we take in is a tiny proportion of the total.  Rich countries generally take in a very small proportion.  The exhibition is free and visitors are invited to make any comments in the book provided.