Archive for December 20, 2015


The last set of pictures of the panels on the tapestry currently in the entrance to the Chapter House at Salisbury Cathedral.  Each panel represents an article from the Universal Declaration of Human RightsVideo

Art 26

Article 26: Everyone has the right to an education, elementary schools should be free and compulsory.  Contributed from the Southampton City group.

 

 

 

 

Art 27Article 27: Everyone has the right to freely participate in the cultural life of the community.  Team effort this by Fay, Janet, Sharon, Sue and Gretel, members of the Romsey group.

 

 

 

 

Art 28Article 28Everyone is entitled to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set out here can be fully respected.  The third panel by our Regional Representative, Caroline Butler.

 

 

 

 

Art 29Article 29: Everyone has duties to the community.  This is the second panel in the tapestry contributed by a refugee group, this time GARAS, the Gloucester Action for Refugees and Asylum Seekers.  GARAS offers support to those seeking asylum in Gloucestershire; welcoming them when they arrive; advocating for them in their daily struggles; supporting them if they face being sent back, as well as helping them adjust to their long term future if they are recognised as refugees.

 

Art 30Article 30: No one has the right to act in such a way as to destroy the rights and freedoms set in in this declaration.  The fourth panel from the Southampton City group.

 

 

 

 

End

 

 

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Nearly there: this is the fifth batch of detailed pictures of the tapestry now in the entrance to the Chapter House at Salisbury Cathedral.  Previous blogs have shown the first twenty panels.  Any errors of if you want to add some detail, please get in touch and we shall be happy to oblige.

Art 21Article 21: Everyone has the right to take part in the government off their country.  Voting should be regular and secret, and all votes should have equal value.  Another panel from the Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch group.

 

 

 

 

Art 22Article 22: Everyone as a member of society, has the right to social security and is entitled to realisation of economic, social and cultural rights.  This panel made by the West Wilts group.

 

 

 

 

Art 23Article 23: Everyone has the right to work and those doing the same work should get equal pay.  Everyone has the right to form and join a trade union.  A second panel from the West Wilts group.

 

 

 

 

Art 24Article 24: Everyone has the right to rest and leisure including reasonable working hours and paid holiday.  A third panel from the Frome group, this time by Fiona and Jeanne.

 

 

 

 

Art 25Article 25: Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for health and wellbeing.  People should be helped if they cannot earn a living.  A third panel from the Bristol group.

 

 

 


This is the fourth batch of pictures of the tapestry which is in the entrance lobby to the Chapter House in Salisbury Cathedral.

Art 16Article 16: Men and women have the right to marry and found a family.  No on should be forced to marry.  This panel by Carol Corke on behalf of the Isle of Wight group.

 

 

 

 

Art 17Article 17: Everyone has the right to own property.  This panel is also by the Isle of Wight group, this time made by Sue Logan.

 

 

 

 

Art 18Article 18: Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion.  And this panel is from our very own Salisbury group made by Fiona Donovan.

 

 

 

 

Art 19Article 19: Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression.  This includes sharing ideas with people from other countries.  Another panel from the Mid Gloucester group, this time by June Styles.

 

 

 

 

Art 20Article 20: Everyone has the right to freedom of peaceful assembly and association.  This panel was made not by an Amnesty group but by the Harbour Project in Swindon.

The Harbour Project welcomes and supports refugees and asylum seekers in Swindon.  To those who’ve risked their lives, families and homes fleeing war and persecution, they provide friendship and hope for a future.   They have been working tirelessly since the Kosovo crisis in 2000.  Today, they are aiding people from across the world.